Sunday, September 30, 2012

Wristwear of the month - Irving's Macramé

This month we return to Oregon, and the Portland Saturday Market – but this time for a very different form of wristwear…

Macramé has been around since the middle ages – a staple of textile, based on knots rather than weaving.  But the art form is a favorite among craftspeople of all ages.  The appeal is in complexity generated, despite the simple methods. Not tools, looms, or special equipment is needed – just skills and a ball of string.  Many people know how to knot macramé – but few do it well.  And I would say that I have now met one man who may be the best – his name is Irving.  He currently displays his fascinating work at the Portland Saturday Market.



Irving first learned from some children in Mexico who were making and selling macramé creations.  He perfected the technique and started using better materials – the results are pretty awesome.


Irving uses waxed nylon string, in various colors to create intricate designs that incorporate many unique objects, from beads to bones.  The most impressive aspect of Irving’s work is the consistency and quality of the knotting.  I have never seen tighter macramé.  Perhaps because I have spent so many hours tying similar knots, I tend to appreciate the knots themselves as much as the designs they form.


With macramé, I recommend selecting

only one or two choice pieces to wear on a regular basis.  Because we all know that too much of a good thing is, well, much less of a good thing… But the right amount in the right colors is a great look. Here's a great example.

So next time you’re in Portland, Oregon, head down to the Saturday market and check out Irving’s great work – you will be amazed.


__________________________________________________________

Wristwear of the Month

As a designer, I spend time searching for new materials and keeping up with the latest in wristwear.  Occasionally, I come across some pretty cool stuff. At Riceling, my main focus is designing for men – a challenging task. In this series, I highlight the most outstanding work of other artists that I think are in line the goals set here at Riceling.